AndyToad

Family Reunion

Posted in art, inspiration, museum by andytoad on August 29, 2013

Some friends I met recently on a visit to Detroit, hanging out in the Detroit Institute of Art.

Ritual Figure early 1900's , Unknown Artist, Kongo Culture, Democratic Republic of Congo

Ritual Figure
early 1900’s , Unknown Artist, Kongo Culture, Democratic Republic of Congo

Female Figure 1300's, Unknown Artist, Chancay Culture, Peru

Female Figure
1300’s, Unknown Artist, Chancay Culture, Peru

Standing Warrior with Club 100 B.C.E. - 400 C.E., Unknown Artist, Jalisco Culture, West Mexico

Standing Warrior with Club
100 B.C.E. – 400 C.E., Unknown Artist, Jalisco Culture, West Mexico

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We Found Love in a Hopeless Place

Posted in art, costume, dance, mask, museum, performance by andytoad on March 12, 2012

One of my favorite pieces in the Brooklyn Museum is the Likishi Dance Costume. I make time to see her whenever I visit.

The Museum’s Likishi dance costume in performance, Zambia, 1935 (Photo: Margaret Carson Hubbard)

Museum Text:

Likishi Dance Costume and Accessories (Mwana Pwevo)

Unidentified Luvale artist, late 19th or early 2oth century
Northwest province, Zambia
Fiber, wood, hide, metal, seedpods, bark, rope, hair, organic materials
 

This complete dance costume shows how masks are normally one part of a larger ensemble. The mask is sewn directly onto the costume of looped bark and fiber, which fits tightly over the body of the dancer. Seedpod rattles and metal bells added a musical aspect to the performance.

Although they are danced by Luvale men, mwana pwevo masks depict women. In order to own and perform with a mask, a man had to symbolically marry it by paying the carver a copper ring as a bride price. In doing so, the dancer made a commitment to honor and care for the spirit represented in the mask. In return, the dancer was able to earn his livelihood performing at local festivals.

Reliquaries and Mother Goddess Figures

Posted in museum, Studio by andytoad on May 19, 2010

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I have reliquaries and “venus” figures on the brain…

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Studio shot of the paper mache reliquaries in process

Christopher working on the inside of “Flosshilde.”

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A few days ago I took a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to do research.

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Outer Coffin of Kharushere

Virgin and Child Reliquary, French, 1170-1200

The Visitation, German, 1310-20

Bust of Saint Yrieix, French, 1220-40 (Made to house his skull)

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Voluptuous ladies from the past, your silhouettes still inspire.

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Venus of Lespugue (resides in France, at the Musée de l’Homme)

Venus of Willendorf (resides in Austria, at the Naturhistorisches Museum)

A Mother Goddess (resides in Turkey, at the Ankara Museum)