AndyToad

Storm King

Posted in art, Sculpture by andytoad on July 24, 2012

Entering the South Fields of Storm King  _  photo: AndyToad

Last week I was able to escape the city for a few days with an excursion up the Hudson River. On one of those days, about 50 miles upriver, tucked away in the Hudson River Valley I found The Storm King Art Center – a fantastic outdoor sculpture museum. Thankfully I wore my walking shoes – for over 100 monumental sculptures are spread out across Storm King’s massive grounds (500 plus acres.)

Here are a few of the many sculptures living amongst the hills, fields and woodlands of the Hudson valley. I strongly recommend a visit.

Adonai  by Alexander Liberman  _  1970 _ Steel  _  photo: AndyToad

Under Adonai  _  photo: AndyToad

Free Ride Home  by Kenneth Snelson  _  1974  _  Aluminum and stainless steel  _  photo: AndyToad

LUBA  by Ursula von Rydingsvard  _  2009-2010  _  Cedar, cast bronze, and graphite  _  photo: AndyToad

LUBA’s view from Museum Hill  _  photo: AndyToad

Solarium  by William Lamson  _  2012  _  Steel, glass, sugar, plants  _  photo: AndyToad

Solarium  by William Lamson  _  2012  _  Steel, glass, sugar, plants  _  photo: AndyToad

View of Mom and Dad through Solarium  _  photo: AndyToad

Three-Legged Buddha  Zhang Huan  _  2007  _  Steel-and-copper  _  photo: AndyToad

Three-Legged Buddha   Zhang Huan   _   2007  _  Steel-and-copper  _  photo: AndyToad

Foci  by Chakaia Booker  _  2010  _  Rubber tire and stainless steel  _  photo: AndyToad

Foci  by Chakaia Booker  _  2010  _  Rubber tire and stainless steel  _  photo: AndyToad

Mermaid  by Roy Lichtenstein  _  1994  _  Painted carbon fiber and epoxy over aluminum  _  photo: AndyToad

Suspended  by Menahse Kadishman  _  1977  _  Weathering steel  _  photo: AndyToad

Endless Column  by Tal Streeter  _  1968  _  Painted steel  _  photo: AndyToad

Advertisements

Coucou Bazar

Posted in art, inspiration by andytoad on March 19, 2012

I love you Dubuffet.

Jean Dubuffet, Don Coucoubazar, 1972. Sheet metal, polyurethane paint, Musée d’Unterlinden, Colmar

 

Goodbye

Posted in art by andytoad on June 1, 2010

Reliquaries and Mother Goddess Figures

Posted in museum, Studio by andytoad on May 19, 2010

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

I have reliquaries and “venus” figures on the brain…

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Studio shot of the paper mache reliquaries in process

Christopher working on the inside of “Flosshilde.”

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

A few days ago I took a trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to do research.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Outer Coffin of Kharushere

Virgin and Child Reliquary, French, 1170-1200

The Visitation, German, 1310-20

Bust of Saint Yrieix, French, 1220-40 (Made to house his skull)

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Voluptuous ladies from the past, your silhouettes still inspire.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Venus of Lespugue (resides in France, at the Musée de l’Homme)

Venus of Willendorf (resides in Austria, at the Naturhistorisches Museum)

A Mother Goddess (resides in Turkey, at the Ankara Museum)


Diving back in

Posted in Studio by andytoad on May 12, 2010

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

A dear friend of mine has inspired and encouraged me to start blogging again. And so, not without some apprehension, I begin. (Hoping to avoid polluting the internet with an esoteric trail of hedonistic self-absorbed residue.)

At the time of this writing I’m focusing most of my energy on a collaboration with my choreographer friend Christopher Williams. I’m designing and building some fairly elaborate costumes for Christopher’s two new piece “Gobbledygook” and “Hen’s Teeth.”
I can’t share too much yet about how they will look. Not until the piece opens. But I’ll share sneaky glimpses of things as they form. Like this webcam shot of me working on a full body reliquary costume:

The blurb for Hen’s Teeth:
Incorporating imagery of the mysterious flying women found in a Breton fairytale preserved by 19th century folklorist François-Marie Luzel, the Graeae, or three swan-like crones of ancient Greek myth who share only one eye and one tooth between them, and that associated with the display of holy relics in the middle ages, Hen’s Teeth is a work for three middle-aged women, six younger women, and one man set to to contemporary music by Gregory Spears in the form of a requiem mass sung in Breton, Latin, and French by members of Lionheart and Anonymous 4 that incorporates elements of the homophonic chanson Cigne ie suis de candeur by Claude Le Jeune (c. 1528-1600)
More info at:
http://www.christopherwilliamsdance.org/performances.php